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There are different alternatives available today for the conventional fossil-fuel vehicle. One of them is the fuel-cell cars. Instead of using conventional fossil fuel to power the vehicles, these use hydrogen and oxygen to power up the vehicles. The end product is electricity and water.

Hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles still have their limitations. There are also still some advantages and disadvantages when it comes to using the technology. However, they still are a more environmentally-friendly alternative to cars with combustion engines.

We’re not here to convince you to trade off your combustion engine car right away. We just want you to consider the many benefits of using such a vehicle. Knowing more about cars with a better impact on the environment is the ultimate future of the car industry.

Advantages Of Fuel-Cell Cars

Renewable And Available Energy Source

Fuel-cell cars use hydrogen for power. It is present in vast amounts, even if there are challenges of extracting it from water. Being a renewable source is one of the many great things about hydrogen. It is a great resource not only for power but for heat as well.

Clean Source Of Energy

One of the problems that we are trying to remedy when we are looking for alternatives to combustion engines is the carbon footprint. Hydrogen fuel cells are a solution to that.

Using them wouldn’t bring about adverse effects to the environment because they only produce water and heat. There are no greenhouse gas emissions and they won’t pollute the air when used. Using them will significantly decrease the carbon footprint.

Apart from that, the production of hydrogen doesn’t require the conversion of huge lands to areas of production. Additionally, the byproducts are non-toxic.

More Efficient Than Fossil Fuel

Compared to fossil fuels, hydrogen fuel cell technology is more efficient. It produces high-density power. Additionally, it can be used to produce more energy than other fuels. Usually, hydrogen fuel cells will consume less fuel as compared to your usual combustion engine vehicle.

Longevity Of Use

One thing you also have to note is the longevity of the car itself. Hydrogen fuel cell-powered engines can be used just as much as conventional combustion engine vehicles. That makes them superior to electric vehicles.

Electric vehicles may be greatly affected by cold weather, causing them to deteriorate. That isn’t the case for cars with hydrogen fuel cells. This makes them further outlast the alternatives.

Other Applications

Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are one of the many applications of this kind of technology. Apart from powering vehicles, they can also be used for other applications such as heating systems. They can also be a good source of power for other smaller products.

UK’s first hydrogen fuel station has opened at Birmingham University, despite a shortage of potential customers.

The station is the first of 12 outlets planned to open nationwide by 2010 and will serve a campus fleet of five fuel-cell cars. It’s the first part of the infrastructure needed to support the far-off prospect of hydrogen-powered cars in the UK.

The vehicles are part of the university’s own fleet, and will allow engineering researchers to learn more about their efficiency and cost-effectiveness.

Professor Kevin Kendall from the University explained the reasoning behind the station: “It is absolutely necessary that we have the means to refuel our fleet of hydrogen-powered cars so that we can carry out our research into the feasibility of hydrogen in a transport context.”

Air Products installed the fuel station and also recently announced that it is working with Transport for London (TfL) to build fuel stations for a fleet of 70 hydrogen-powered vehicles being introduced from next year.

Meanwhile, the hydrogen itself will be provided by Green Gases Ltd, which manufactures the gas using renewable biomass energy, an approach the university claims will ensure that both the manufacturing process and use of the fuel cells will result in no carbon emissions.

Further growth is expected, with perhaps 12 hydrogen filling stations around the UK by 2010, raising the possibility of commercial production of cars powered by fuel cells.